Grapes

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Here you can find a grape by selecting a colour and/or a type. Use filters to refine your search or the direct search function.

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Acolon

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
Germany
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
Artificial cross of Blaufränkisch and Dornfelder created at the Weinsberg Research Centre in Baden-Württemberg (D) in 1971, Acolon was officially registered in 2002. An early grape rich in anthocyanins and sugar, this variety is quite common in the Rhineland Palatinate region of Germany, but it is rarely found in Switzerland, where it produces wines similar to its ancestor Blaufränkisch (or Blauer Limberger).

Aligoté

Color: 
 White
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
France
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
Aligoté is a natural cross between Pinot and Gouais Blanc, which appeared in the late 18th century in the Saone valley in Burgundy (F). It is therefore a full-sibling of Gamay, Chardonnay, Melon and other lesser known varieties. Its name could derive from Gôt, an old synonym of Gouais Blanc, its genitor which was once widespread and is now almost extinct. An early grape that is prone to fungal disease, with varying yields depending on the terroir, Aligoté is grown mainly on the Côte d'Or and at Chablis in Burgundy, where it is also used for making kir. In Switzerland, it is mainly grown in Geneva, where it produces wines with a refreshing natural acidity.

Amigne

Color: 
 White
Ancientness: 
Indigenous
Origin: 
Switzerland
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
A native variety of the Valais region in Switzerland, Amigne was first recorded towards the end of the 17th century, between Sierre and Sion, before it became established at Vétroz, which has become its territory of choice (with 70 % of the Amigne variety grown in the world). Although it may be a grandchild of Savagnin Blanc (known as Heida or Païen in Valais) and Gouais Blanc, Amigne is an orphan variety. Its alleged Roman origins cannot be substantiated. Prone to coulure and millerandage, this chameleon variety can produce dry, mellow or sweet ("flértis") wines, whose sweetness is indicated in Vétroz with a label showing 1, 2 or 3 bees.

Ancellotta

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
Italy
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
A variety originating in Emilia-Romagna in the north of Italy, Ancellotta was named after the Lancellotti family of Modena, which most likely propagated it from the 13th or 14th centuries. In Switzerland, this late-ripening variety with a rich colour and relatively neutral taste is mainly grown in the Valais region, and generally used to improve the colour of local Pinot-based wines. It is one of the ancestors of Galotta.

Arvine

Petite arvine
Color: 
 White
Ancientness: 
Indigenous
Origin: 
Switzerland
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
This flagship variety, native to Valais (Switzerland) is mentioned in records dating back to 1602 under the name Arvena, which could mean "upstart, new arrival". This etymology is explained by the fact that it is an orphan variety, as DNA testing has not found any relatives. Its alleged Roman origins cannot be substantiated. Often referred to as Petite Arvine, as opposed to Grosse Arvine which is probably one of its offsprings, Arvine is almost exclusively grown in Valais where it produces dry or sweet ("flétris") wines of international standard, with a citrus aroma and refreshing acidity. Traces of it can also be found in other Swiss cantons, as well as in Valle d'Aosta (I) and in France.

Auxerrois

Color: 
 White
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
France
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
A variety from Alsace-Lorraine (F), Auxerrois should not be confused with Pinot Blanc, Pinot Gris or Chardonnay, which were also referred to as Auxerrois at one point, probably in reference to Auxois, the old name for Alsace. DNA tests have shown that it is the natural descendant of Pinot and Gouais Blanc, and thus a full-sibling of Chardonnay, Gamay, Aligoté and other minor varieties. In Switzerland, Auxerrois is now rarely grown, but it may be similar to the (H)Aussard or Ausserres variety which was very common in the 18th and 19th centuries in the cantons of Neuchâtel and Vaud. The wine has a relatively neutral flavour, with low acidity levels.

Barbera

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
Italy
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
Barbera probably originates from somewhere between Lombardia and Emilia-Romagna (I). It wasn't until after the phylloxera crisis in the late 19th century that it became widespread in Piedmont, particularly in the Alba and Asti regions. A productive variety, producing wines that are rich in colour and alcohol, with minimal cultivation in Switzerland.

Bianca

Color: 
 White
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
Central Europe
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
A hybrid of Eger 2 and Bouvier created in 1963 at the Kölyuktetö research centre in the Eger region (Hungary). An early grape, productive and resistant to frost and disease, it is quite widespread in Hungary, with only a modest presence in Switzerland. Its wine has a neutral taste, with moderate alcohol levels.

Blaufränkisch

Frankonia
Frankovka
Kékfrankos
Limberger
Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
Eastern Europe
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
Blaufränkisch is one of many offsprings of Gouais Blanc, an old variety that was once grown throughout Europe. Now very widely cultivated in Austria, the historical distribution of Blaufränkisch includes Germany (under the name Limberger), Hungary (Kekfrankos) and Croatia (Borgonja), so its place of origin is likely to be at the crossroads of these regions. Sporadically present in Switzerland, this late-ripening variety prone to fungal disease produces structured wines with intense colours and sustained acidity.

Bondola

Briegler
Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Indigenous
Origin: 
Switzerland
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
Previously the most widely grown variety in Ticino (Switzerland) where there are records of it dating back to 1785, Bondola was rapidly supplanted by the Merlot introduced in 1906 after the phylloxera crisis. DNA tests have shown that Bondola and Briegler in German-speaking Switzerland are identical. A variety with rustic tannins and distinct acidity, it is now only grown in Ticino, particularly in Sopraceneri, where it produces wines that are fruity and crisp with an Alpine character.

Cabernet Dorsa

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
Germany
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
Red grape made from a cross of Blaufränkisch and Dornfelder.

Cabernet Franc

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
Spain
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
Although it is one of the original varieties of the great wines of Bordeaux (F), the ancestral origins of Cabernet Franc are in the Spanish Basque Country. From there it expanded into Gironde, then to the Loire region, where it has become one of the most commonly grown red grapes. DNA tests have revealed that it is the direct genitor of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Carmenère. In Switzerland, this mid-season variety, resistant to fungal disease, is grown in particular in French-speaking Switzerland and in Ticino, where it produces wine with an aroma of violets, high in tannins, with more or less herbaceous notes depending on the yields.

Cabernet Sauvignon

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
France
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
A flagship variety of Bordeaux (F), Cabernet Sauvignon is one of the most commonly grown grapes in the world. The unexpected discovery of its heritage in 1997 was big news: it's a natural cross between Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc, which probably took place in Gironde before the 18th century. This makes it a half-sibling of Merlot and Carmenère. In Switzerland, this variety prone to fungal disease is grown essentially for making Bordeaux blends (with Cabernet Franc and Merlot), adding notes of blackcurrants and blackberries.

Carminoir

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Indigenous
Origin: 
Switzerland
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
An artificial cross of Pinot Noir and Cabernet Sauvignon, Carminoir was created in 1982 at the Agroscope Research Centre in Pully (Switzerland) with the goal of obtaining a richer variety than Pinot Noir, which was resistant to grey mould. A late-ripening variety, Carminoir is not common in Switzerland, limited to the hottest regions of Valais and Ticino, where it gives wines that are colourful, strong and rich in tannins, used for blends or as a single variety.

Chambourcin

Color: 
 Red
Ancientness: 
Foreign (after 1900)
Origin: 
France
Viticulture: 
-
Aromatic: 
-
An inter-species hybrid of Seyve-Villard 12-417 and Chancellor created in 1945 by Joannes Seyve in France, it was named after the village of Chambourcin in Isère (F) and first sold in 1963. Resistant to cold and fungal disease, it can be planted in humid conditions. It produces highly aromatic wines. It has a very minor presence in Switzerland, mostly in Ticino.

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